CORMAC McCARTHY, ANOTHER SHY IRISHMAN

Posted on St Patrick’s Day, 17 MARCH 2015;

Cormac McCarthy is one of our greatest living writers. He surfaced for many readers after two of his later books: The Road, and No Country for Old Men. Both were made into films.

When he was younger and winning the National Book Award (All the Pretty Horses), his ex-wife said that they lived in a pig barn in Tennessee. He would receive occasional offers by mail for teaching positions at leading universities and tear them up. “It would be tinned beans for another 3 months and no heat in the barn,” she recalled. “But his time was like gold for him. It was not for sale.” (My paraphrase.)

His earlier books like Child of God, and The Crossing, are among my all-time favorites in fiction.He rarely grants interviews, but I found this one in the Paris Review. It appears to be sarcastic — I wondered if he actually speaks like this and at first doubted it. But then I reconsidered and decided he actually has the ability to talk in this kind of prose. I still don’t know if this is made up, however. It is funny, either way: http://www.theparisreview.org/the-art-of-fiction-no-223-cormac-mccarthy — Mark Sullivan

Posted in Fiction

OP-ED ARTICLE SUBMITTED TO THE NEW YORK TIMES ON 12 OCTOBER 2014

by
Jonathan Kurland Wise, M.D., F.A.C.P. (Harvard College and Medical School, Clinical Professor of Medicine at Tulane Medical School)
and Mark Sullivan (director and writer at manhattanliterary.com)

___________________________________________________________

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN EBOLA MEETS A FEDERAL REGULATORY BUREAUCRACY THAT IS OUT OF CONTROL?

The American federal government and our legal system have made documentation more important than Good Clinical Practice. This deprived Mr. Thomas E. Duncan of a better chance to survive Ebola, and it drives fear into the Dallas community that the deadly disease will now spread through their city.

Making documentation the highest priority in a hospital or medical office contributes to the deterioration of the practice of medicine, while, paradoxically, increasing its cost significantly. Clicking boxes in the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) has become more important to a provider’s practice than thinking. This happens from moment to moment in the new environment, but only becomes obvious to the public when patients read their own medical records and realize that they may never have answered such a question, and that, to their bewilderment, the record has little to do with them.

But now, as the basic problem explodes into public awareness, one has to look with dismay and fear at the horrendous handling of a patient seen in the ER at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, Dallas. Mr Thomas Eric Duncan (deceased yesterday) was sent away despite being infected with the Ebola Virus. And this happened in a city already targeted as an Ebola risk, putting all others at risk.

So, what actually happened?

Read more ›

Posted in Non Fiction